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Download Johnny Rivers - Where Have All The Flowers Gone

Download Johnny Rivers - Where Have All The Flowers Gone
Performer: Johnny Rivers
Title: Where Have All The Flowers Gone
Country: Sweden
Genre: Rock / Pop
Released: 1965
Catalog number: LIB 12022
Label: Liberty
MP3 album szie: 2304 mb
FLAC album size: 2643 mb

Tracklist

1Where Have All The Flowers Gone
2Catch The Wind

Versions

CategoryArtistTitle (Format)LabelCategoryCountryYear
LIB 12022Johnny Rivers Where Have All The Flowers Gone ‎(7", Single)LibertyLIB 12022Denmark1965

Credits

  • ProducerLou Adler

Notes

A Dunhill Production.
Recording First Published 1965

Companies

  • Made By – Dunhill
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Short intro

Where Have All the Flowers Gone. Лента с персональными рекомендациями и музыкальными новинками, радио, подборки на любой вкус, удобное управление своей коллекцией. Where Have All the Flowers Gone is a modern folk-style song. The melody and the first three verses were written by Pete Seeger in 1955 and published in Sing Out magazine. Additional verses were added in May 1960 by Joe Hickerson, who turned it into a circular song. In 2010, the New Statesman listed it as one of the Top 20 Political Songs. These images illustrate what Johnny Rivers looked like in 1965. Where Have All The Flowers Gone. Johnny Rivers - Greatest Hits FULL ALBUM - BEST OF POP - BEST OF FOLK - BEST OF BLUES - Продолжительность: 58:35 Vintage JukeBox. Текст песни: Where have all the flowers gone Long time passing Where have all the flowers gone Long time the video for Where Have All The Flowers Gone from Johnny Rivers's 20 Rock'N'Roll Hits for free, and see the artwork, lyrics and similar artists. Johnny Rivers born John Henry Ramistella on November 7, 1942 in New York City is an American rock and roll singer, songwriter, guitarist, and record producer. He was versatile enough to d read more. He was versatile enough to do folk songs, blues, covers of old-time Rock n read more. Similar Artists. Play all. Listen to Where Have All The Flowers Gone by Johnny Rivers. Johnny Rivers. Where Have All the Flowers Gone This song is by Johnny Rivers and appears on the album Johnny Rivers Rocks The Folk 1965 and on the album City Ways 1969. This song is a cover of Where Have All the Flowers Gone by Pete Seeger. Where have all the flowers goneLong time passingWhere have all the flowers goneLong time agoWhere have all the flowers goneGirls have picked them, every oneWhen will they ever learnWhen will they ever learn . Album Johnny Rivers Rocks the Folk. Where Have All the Flowers Gone Lyrics. Where have all the flowers gone Long time passin' Where have all the flowers gone A long, long time ago. Where have all the flowers gone Young girls picked them every one When will they ever learn When will they ever learn Where have all the young girls gone Long time passing Where have all the young girls gone A long time ago. Where have all the young girls gone Taken husbands every one When will they ever learn When will they ever learn Where have all the young men gone Long time passin' Where have. It was renamed Where Have All The Children Gone, and this ad of the same name was from the US Department of Justice, the National Crime Prevention Council, and the Ad Council. Peter, Paul And Mary's version was used in the 1994 movie Forrest Gump. As already stated above Johnny Rivers reached 26 with it in 1965, that was on November 7th for 1 week and it spent 9 weeks on the Top 100. On the same 'Williams' show the trio sang Gordon Lightfoot's Early Morning Rain on the Top 100 Peter, Paul & Mary reached 91 with it in 1965 and on Billboard's Hot Country Singles chart, in 1966 George Hamilton IV took his version to 9. A recording that Johnny Rivers says that he's like to forget, the Kingston Trio's Pete Seeger-written version of this song was suggested to Rivers by producer Lou Adler as an appropriate cover. With the huge tide of folk-rock that was sweeping the airwaves in late 1965, this version easily went Top 40. An early anti-war statement, Rivers' version adds some not too subtle 12-string jangle to the hot-wired beat. A little limp, it still retains a strong period charm. Appears On